Photo Gallery

Taken at Camden Yards FARP.  From left to right standing: Weasel, IKE, JoJo, Fuse, Spock.  From left to right kneeling: Gash, Shoe, BT.  Hanging from the Cobra's wing in the back are three hellfire missiles and a full seven-shot rocket pod. pg 184

Taken at Camden Yards FARP. From left to right standing: Weasel, IKE, JoJo, Fuse, Spock. From left to right kneeling: Gash, Shoe, BT. Hanging from the Cobra’s wing in the back are three hellfire missiles and a full seven-shot rocket pod. pg 184

There are no pictures in After Action.  Instead, I offer them here to round out the reader’s understanding of the men and environment I wrote about.  Some of the pictures I took, some were taken by other members of my division.  Spock took some of the best ones.

I have included page numbers in the description when the photographs correspond to specific actions and events in the book.

Gash (left) and I on the deck of the USS Belleau Wood as we pull out of San Diego Harbor in 2002, about nine months before the invasion of Iraq.

Gash (left) and I on the deck of the USS Belleau Wood as it pulls out of San Diego Harbor in 2002, about nine months before the invasion of Iraq.

Teddy Treadwell clowning around with empty TOW missile tubes at Ali Al Salem airfield in Kuwait, Oct 2000.

Teddy Treadwell clowning around with empty TOW missile tubes at Ali Al Salem airfield in Kuwait, Oct 2000.

The view from the back seat of a Cobra.  The difference between this one (flying in Hawaii) and ours in Iraq was the windscreen.  In Iraq it would be covered with bug guts, soot, and sand.  Gash could barely see anything from the back seat of our aircraft in Iraq.

The view from the back seat of a Cobra. The difference between this one (flying in Hawaii) and ours in Iraq was the windscreen. In Iraq it would be covered with bug guts, soot, and sand. Gash could barely see anything from the back seat of our aircraft in Iraq.

Gash (left) and I pointing out bullet holes in our aircraft, 23 March 2003.  Taken just after we landed from 19 hour flight that culminated in the fight at An Nasiriyah.  pg 163.

Gash (left) and I pointing out bullet holes in our aircraft, 23 March 2003. Taken just after we landed from 19 hour flight that culminated in the fight at An Nasiriyah. pg 163.

Flying north along Highway 7 into the attack, 26 March 2003.  BT and Spock's aircraft are just visible above the highway and two friendly armored vehicles are underneath them.  Visibility got worse before we called it quits.  pg. 175

Flying north along Highway 7 into the attack, 26 March 2003. BT and Spock’s aircraft are just visible above the highway and two friendly armored vehicles are underneath them. Visibility got worse before we called it quits. pg. 175

BT and Spock's aircraft are just visible through the sandstorm, 26 March 2003.  We fought several engagements in this weather before it became too dangerous.  Here we are moving north toward Al Shatra.  pg 177

BT and Spock’s aircraft are just visible through the sandstorm, 26 March 2003. We fought several engagements in this weather before it became too dangerous. Here we are moving north toward Al Shatra. pg 177

A picture of me taken shortly after the dust storm forced us to land at Camden Yards FARP, 25 March 2003.  pg. 184

A picture of me taken shortly after the dust storm forced us to land at Camden Yards FARP, 25 March 2003. pg. 184

Crew rest for Cobra pilots.  Taken shortly after the sandstorm forced us to land at Camden Yards FARP.  Near to far: Gash, Weasel, IKE, JoJo, Fuse, Spock.  The rain didn't start until nightfall.  25 March 2003 pg 184

Crew rest for Cobra pilots. Taken shortly after the sandstorm forced us to land at Camden Yards FARP. Near to far: Gash, Weasel, IKE, JoJo, Fuse, Spock. The rain didn’t start until nightfall. 25 March 2003 pg 184

Gash and I preparing to stand guard as the visibility dropped to less than 50'.  25 March 2003.  pg. 185

Gash and I preparing to stand guard as the visibility dropped to less than 50′. 25 March 2003. pg. 185

After three days of dust storm, clear and cold weather greeted us on the morning of 27 March, 2003.  We launched moments later for the engagement on pages 197-212.  Left to right: Gash, Shoe, IKE, Weasel, Fuse, BT

After three days of dust storm, clear and cold weather greeted us on the morning of 27 March, 2003. We launched moments later for the engagement on pages 197-212. Left to right: Gash, Shoe, IKE, Weasel, Fuse, BT

Taken shortly after we finally made it back to Kuwait after the 4 day dust storm.  From left to right: Weasel, Shoe, Gash, BT, Fuse, IKE.  Missing are Spock and JoJo--still in Iraq after being shot down during the final mission of those four days.  It would be several more days before maintenance Marines could get their aircraft flyable again.

Taken shortly after we finally made it back to Kuwait after the long sandstorm, 27 March 2003. From left to right: Weasel, Shoe, Gash, BT, Fuse, IKE. Missing are Spock and JoJo–still in Iraq after being shot down during the final mission of those four days. It would be several more days before maintenance Marines could repair all the damage and make their aircraft flyable again. pg 210

 

Weasel playing on a destroyed Iraqi ZPU-4 near Salman Pak airfield.

Weasel playing on a destroyed Iraqi ZPU-4 near Salman Pak airfield.

From left to right: Travis Ford, Ben Sammis, Nelson, Ski, Perona.  Professionals all.  pg 258

From left to right: Travis Ford, Ben Sammis, Nelson, Ski, Perona. Professionals all. pg 258

BT tracing the path of the bullet that narrowly missed his head.  pg. 247

BT tracing the path of the bullet that narrowly missed his head. pg. 247

Prepping for a mission with MCSOCOM Det One, Baghdad 2004.  Armed with an M-4 and a .45cal Kimber, the radio on my back was my most lethal weapon.  pg 289

Prepping for a mission with MCSOCOM Det One, Baghdad 2004. Armed with an M-4 and a .45cal Kimber, the radio on my back was my most lethal weapon. pg 289

Relatively safe from enemy fire, I felt comfortable controlling airstrikes without my helmet on.  It was well over 110 degrees in the building we were occupying--August in Najaf.  pg 289

Relatively safe from enemy fire, I felt comfortable controlling airstrikes without my helmet on. It was well over 110 degrees in the building we were occupying–August in Najaf. pg 289

After several sleepless days and nights in Najaf, the heat and fatigue made simple actions difficult.  The post-mission report I'm scribbling in my notebook is almost incomprehensible. August 2004  pg 289

After several sleepless days and nights in Najaf, the heat and fatigue made simple actions difficult. The post-mission report I’m scribbling in my notebook is almost incomprehensible. August 2004 pg 289

 

My father, Dan Sheehan, before heading out on a mission in his OV-10 Bronco, Binh Thuy, 1969.  His squadron, VAL-4, was the only navy squadron flying the OV-10 in a close air support role.  His missions in Vietnam, and mine in Iraq, bore striking similarities.

My father, Dan Sheehan, before heading out on a mission in his OV-10 Bronco, Binh Thuy, 1969. His squadron, VAL-4, was the only navy squadron flying the OV-10 in a close air support role. His missions in Vietnam bore striking similarities to mine in Iraq.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 thoughts on “Photo Gallery

  1. Captain Ed Hrivnak

    Dan, really enjoyed this webpage and what is on createspace about you. You and I have similar experiences and I’m ordering your book. Look forward to reading it. Check out WOUNDED on Amazon. It’s free right now on Kindle. Interested to see how my book compares to yours with the dealing to civilian life. I will promote your book on my facebook page. Respectfully, Ed Hrivnak (Retired Air Force)

    Reply
    1. Dan Sheehan Post author

      Thanks, Ed. I just downloaded “Wounded” and look forward to reading it. Thanks for your interest in my book and for your compassionate care of those wounded service-members in the back of your bird. Best of luck for continued success with your writing career.

      R/S,
      Dan

      Reply
  2. Tony

    Hello Dan,
    I would like to thank you for your military service. I myself served in the Air Force for three years and received a medical discharge for Bipolar. The military is not for everyone, but you seem to have been someone who the military was for. I read your story that was posted on Amazon, and it was amazing.

    I was wondering how old you are, because you still look pretty young. I myself am 25, so im still pretty young too.

    Please send me a reply at your best convenience.

    Thank you!

    Reply
    1. Dan Sheehan Post author

      Hi Tony,
      Thank you for your service as well. I’m rapidly closing in on 40 years old–hard to believe it sometimes–and was 28 during the invasion of Iraq. Hope you are finding your way forward after the Air Force.

      Best,
      Dan

      Reply
  3. Sgt. Mac

    Dan,

    Did a review on your book months ago, on Sgt. Mac’s Blog which is now defunct. Currently writing some online articles and working on a review for Hub Pages. Like to re-publish my book review on you for Hub Pages. Would like permissioin to use some of the photos here.

    Thanks,

    Sgt. Mac 😉

    Reply
    1. Dan Sheehan Post author

      Great to hear from you again, Sgt. Mac.

      Feel free to use any of the pictures you’d like. Good luck with the new blog and thanks for asking for permission.

      Best Wishes,
      Dan

      Reply
  4. Sgt. Mac

    Thanks for the permission. Like the page by the way. Hope you and the family are doing well. 😉

    Sgt. Mac

    Reply
    1. sheehandb@gmail.com Post author

      Thanks, Jeff. Things are going well, enjoying being home with the kids and knocking out some writing now and then. Hope you and your family are well.

      Reply

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